“T-Square 54” B-29 Chronological Timeline

  • Manufactured at the Boeing factory in Wichita, Kansas

    After acceptance by the Air Force, she went into action flying from the islands in the Pacific. She was flown on 36 missions over Japan.

  • Famous B-29 Gathering

    On being declared surplus to requirements, she was sent to the Navy Gunnery range at China Lake, Mojave Desert, California. There she met two other B-29's: FIFI, currently the only flying B-29 in the world. Doc, the B-29 undergoing restoration at Wichita.

  • Museum Restoration

    Our B-29 was rescued and went to Lowry Air Force Base to be displayed in their new museum in Denver. The museum staff undertook some initial restoration and preservation but plans fell through. She was then dismantled and sent by several trucks to Seattle.

  • Back at Boeing Seattle

    After re-assembly in Plant II by the same volunteers who worked on the B-17, skin assembly, and final re-assembly, she was towed to the ramp at the sound end of Boeing Field.

  • In The Right Hands

    For several years on the ramp, a small crew worked on the interior of the aircraft. After salvaging remaining parts from the Mojave Desert, she was moved into Boeing Plant II where most of the work on this website took place.

The “T-Square 54” B-29 was manufactured at the Boeing factory in Wichita, Kansas. After acceptance by the Air Force, she went into action flying from the islands in the Pacific. She was flown on 36 missions over Japan, an exceptionally high number for an aircraft to have survived.

After her wartime service she continued to be used, modified by the U.S. Air Force for flight refueling experiments, and spent some time in Korea.

On being declared surplus to requirements, she was sent to the Navy Gunnery range at China Lake, Mojave Desert, California. Together with several other amous B-29 aircraft, including “FIFI”, currently the only flying B-29 in the world, and “DOC”, the B-29 undergoing restoration at Wichita.

Our B-29 was rescued and went to Lowry Air Force Base to be displayed in their new museum in Denver. The museum staff undertook some initial restoration and preservation but when plans for the museum fell through, she was dismantled and sent by several trucks to Seattle.

Re-assembled in Plant II, primarily by the same volunteers who worked on the B-17 at Renton. After some major skin replacements, and final re-assembly, she was towed to the ramp at the south end of Boeing Field, close to the Museum. A complete nose section from another B-29, “Big Boy” was obtained and all the cabin equipment was tranferred to our B-29.

For several years outside on the south ramp of the Museum, a small dedicated crew worked steadily on the interior of the aircraft. During this time, the crew went back to the Mojave Desert several times to salvage the last remaining useable parts – some propellers, an additional rear turret, and a portside wing.

Soon after, she was finally able to move into Boeing Plant II where most of the work described on this website took place; including the repair of the replacement wing by the Everett Restoration Center.

The result of the thousands of hours of work by skilled volunteers, documented on this website, is one of the most authentic and complete B-29s in the world, including computer controlled gun turrets which actually work. This is unique!